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Mill Creek Police Department takes first steps in creating strategic plan

 

September 6, 2019



Mill Creek Police Chief Greg Elwin highlighted the importance of a strategic plan for the city’s police department at a City Council meeting on Sept. 3.

The strategic plan is a document used to communicate goals within the department while developing actions to achieve overdue projects. The Mill Creek Police Department aims to compete the plan by the end of the second quarter of 2020, according to Elwin.

“It is a management activity that helps set priorities and focuses energy and resource personnel to meet goals from the community,” he said.

Over the years, any past strategic planning was incorporated into the biennial budget process and updated each time by the department’s command staff without input from outside sources. The council agenda summary said a change in leadership in 2016 allowed the police department to review projects and look for areas of improvement.

In January 2016, the department was reviewed by the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC) and their Loaned Executive Management Assistance Program (LEMAP). The LEMAP team conducted evaluations of operations and provided the department with a report with 106 strategic planning recommendations.

A second study by the Center for Public Safety Management (CPSM) was completed in 2017. The CPSM also reviewed operations and interviewed staff. Their executive summary provided 17 recommendations for each of the department’s functions.

After these studies, Mill Creek’s department put together a list of key outcomes and activities related to long-term strategic planning for the 2019-2020 biennium. These outcomes were organized into three groups: administrative division, patrol division, and support services division.

The Strategic Planning Steering Committee, led by Elwin, will form three stakeholder groups. The committee aims to work towards a common goal with residents, City Council members, and police.

Partner stakeholders are comprised of councilmembers, City staff, prosecutors, etc. External stakeholders are community members, business owners, and other forms of local groups. Internal stakeholders are department representatives, both commissioned and non-commissioned.

Each stakeholder group will be asked to provide thoughts and input on a range of topics, including crime response and enforcement, employee wellness, department staffing needs, community outreach and engagement, and quality of life issues.

“This will set the stage for us to be better than we were yesterday,” said Elwin.

 

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